Information for visitors

We are looking forward to welcoming you to Amerikahaus. 

Visiting our exhibitions and events is currently possible for everyone; a COVID-test result is not required. Wearing a mask (medical or FFP2) at Amerikahaus is currently not mandatory, but we still recommend it in order to protect your health and the health of other visitors and staff. Depending on which area of the Amerikahaus you wish to visit, please click here and read the instructions and information for the specific area.

Please refrain from visiting if you feel unwell or have cold or flu-like symptoms.

The exhibitions are closed on public holidays, from Friday, June 17, 2022, through Sunday, June 19, 2022 as well as on Sunday, July 3, 2022.

Thank you very much for your cooperation and understanding. 

Elizabeth Klerman ©John Soares of Arlington MA

Elizabeth Klerman: It’s About Time. Sleep and Daily Rhythms

Tuesday, July 12, 2022, 7 p.m.

Biology has many rhythms whose periods range from milliseconds rhythms, lunar/monthly, and yearly; some insect species even have multi-year cycles.

Circadian rhythms are internally generated in almost all living organisms. In mammals, the master circadian clock is located in the brain, and its internal rhythm is synchronized to the environmental day by light information transmitted through the eye. In turn, the circadian clock affects all known physiology, including the timing and content of sleep, hormone release, mood and alertness, metabolism, hunger and gastrointestinal function, cardiovascular function, and neurobehavioral performance.

Appropriate timing of medications or interventions is important for improving clinical results and/or reducing adverse side effects. When the circadian clock is not synchronized to the environmental time, as in night shift-work or jet-lag, these systems are disrupted and people complain of being tired when they want to be awake, insomnia, stomach distress, poor alertness, and other symptoms.

Sleep is the most obvious rhythm affected by the circadian clock. Sufficient sleep is vital for normal function; insufficient sleep and/or sleep disorders are associated with increased risk of hypertension, obesity, mood disorders, errors and accidents. In this talk, I will discuss these biological rhythms and how they affect performance and mood.


Welcome address: Kerstin Schmidt, Bavarian American Academy
Introduction and moderation: Lauren Tonti, Harvard Club Munich


Photo: Elizabeth Klerman ©John Soares of Arlington MA

Please register here for free. You do not need a XING account to be able to register.
https://www.xing-events.com/elizabethklerman

Elizabeth Klerman ©John Soares of Arlington MA

Dr. Klerman is a Professor of Neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston MA, USA. She received her Bachelors degree from MIT and her MD and PhD degrees from Harvard University. At Massachusetts General Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, her areas of research are (i) the application of circadian and sleep research principles to normal and pathophysiologic states and (ii) mathematical analysis and modeling of human circadian rhythms and sleep. She also is active in teaching and mentoring in patient-oriented research for medical school students, fellows, and junior faculty.

Amerikahaus

Karolinenplatz 3, 80333, Munich

Dr. Margaretha Schweiger-Wilhelm

Managing Director
Bavarian American Academy

Email
schweiger-wilhelm@amerika-akademie.de

Telephone
+49 89 552537-42